13 Things To Remember When You Love A Person Who Has Depression

This is an interesting read on depression, if you wish to subscribe please do so. This blog site is created with the help of Robert A Williams please check Robert’s Blog at blog.rawilliams.co.uk

1. Depression is a choice.

Depression is one of the most helpless and frustrating experiences a person can have. It’s sometimes feeling sad, sometimes feeling empty, and sometimes feeling absolutely nothing at all. There are times when depression can leave someone feeling paralyzed in their own mind and body, unable to do the things they used to love to do or the things they know they should be doing. Depression is not just a bad day or a bad mood and it’s not something someone can just “get over.”Remember no one chooses to be depressed.

2. Saying things like itll get better,” you just need to get out of the house,” or youll be fine is meaningless.

Its easy to tell someone these things because you think youre giving them a solution or a simple way to make them feel better and to ease their pain, but these kinds of phrases always come across as empty, insulting, and essentially meaningless.

Saying these phrases to them only create more tension within, making them feel as though theyre inadequate, and like youre not acknowledging what theyre going through by trying to put a band aid on a much larger issue. They understand you’re just trying to help but these words only make them feel worse. A silent hug can do so much more than using cliched sayings.

What you can say instead:

Avoid offering advice but instead just let them know you’re there for them and ask them questions to help guide them in discovering what could make them feel better.

3. Sometimes they have to push you away before they can bring you closer.

People who suffer from depressionoften get frustrated with feeling like they’re a burden on other people. This causes them to isolate themselves and push away people they need the most, mentally exhausting themselvesfrom worrying about if they’re weighing their loved ones down with their sadness. If they become distant, just remember to let them know you’re still there, but don’t try to force them to hang out or talk about what’s going on if they don’t want to.

4. Youre allowed to get frustrated.

Just because someone deals with depression doesnt mean you have to cater to all of their needs or walk around eggshells when youre around them. Depressed people need to feel loved and supported but if it begins to create a negative impact on your life youre allowed to acknowledge this and figure out how to show them love and kindness withoutself-sacrificing.

5. It’s important to discuss and create boundaries.

In those moments of frustration it’s important to take a step back and look at how you can help the depressed person while also maintaining your own sense of happiness and fulfillment. Be patient. Talk to them about your concerns and explain the boundaries you need to create within your relationship. Find out something that works for both of you.

6. They can become easily overwhelmed.

Constant exhaustion is a common side effect of depression. Just getting through the day can be an overwhelming and exhausting experience. They may seem and look totally fine one moment and in the next moment feel tired and have no energy at all, even if they’re getting plenty of sleep every night. This can result in them canceling plans suddenly, leaving events early, or saying no to things altogether. Just remember it’s not about anything you did. It’s just one of the prevalent side effects of living with the disease.

7. It’s not about you.

When you have a loved one dealing with depression it can be difficult to understand what they’re going through and to consider how their sadness is a reflection of your relationship with them. If they need space or become distant don’t blame yourself and wonder how you could do things differently to heal them. Understand their depression is not about you.

8. Avoid creating ultimatums, making demands, or using a “tough-love” approach.

Telling someone you’re going to break up with them or not talk to them anymoreif they don’t get better is not going to magically cure them of their illness. They won’t suddenly become the person you want them to be just because you’re tired of dealing with their problems. It’s a personal decision to walk away from someone if their issues become too much for you and your relationship with them, but thinking the ‘tough-love’ approach will make them better is unrealistic and manipulative.

9. They don’t always want to do this alone.

Many often assume people dealing with depression want to just be left alone. While there are may be times when they want their space, this doesn’t mean they want to face their fears completely alone. Offer to take them on a drive somewhere. Ask if they want to get coffee or a meal.One on one time where you can bring them out of their routine and where you two can connect can often mean everything for them. Reach out to them unexpectedly. Remind them they don’t have to do this alone.

10. Try not to compare your experiences with theirs.

When someone is going through a rough time we often want to share with them our own stories to let them know you’ve gone through something similar and can relate with their struggle. When you say something like, “oh yeah, this one time I was depressed too…” it only makes them feel like you’re minimizing their pain. Express empathy but don’t suppress their feelings. The greatest resource you can share with your friend is your ability to listen. That’s all they really need.

11. It’s okay to ask your friend where they are in their feelings.

How are they really feeling and how are they coping with their depression? Suicidal thoughts are a common occurrence for depressed people and it’s okay to directly ask them ways they’re practicing self-care and to come up with a safety plan for times when their depression becomes too overwhelming.

12. Schedule time to spend together.

Offer to spend time with them once or twice a week to exercise, grocery shop, or hang out together. Ask if you can cook dinner with them and plan a friend date. One of the hardest parts of depression is feeling too exhausted tocook healthy meals, so you can really help them out by cooking food they can store in their fridge or freezer for a later time.

13. Just because someone is depressed doesn’t mean that they’re weak.

In his book , author Eric G. Wilson explores the depths of sadness and how experiencing mental anguish can actually make us more empathetic, creative people. Although he explains the difference between depression and melancholia, he rejects the idea of inflated happiness our culture and society is obsessed with, and instead explains why we reap benefits from the darker moments in life. Wilson writes:

In a similar manner psychiatrist and philosopher, Dr. Neel Burton, discusses in hisTedx talkabouthow some of the most influential and important people in history have experienced depression. He explains the way our culture looks at and treats depression and howtraditional societies differ in their approach, seeing human distress asan indicator of the need to address important life problems, not a mentalillness.

It’s important to remember depression is not something that should beconsidered shamefuland experiencing it doesn’t make someone weak or inadequate.

Read more: http://thoughtcatalog.com/koty-neelis/2015/04/13-things-to-remember-when-you-love-a-person-who-has-depression/

These photos from around the world should scare the pants off of McDonald’s and Walmart.

 

Low-wage workers all across America are walking off the job today to protest for a $15-per-hour minimum wage and a union.

 

“What?” You might be saying to yourself. “Why does the 16-year-old grimacing at me from behind the counter at Wendy’s while she texts her boyfriend selfies of her new temporary tattoo deserve to make that much money?”

(OK, Stephanie. OK.)

Because contrary to popular belief, most minimum- and low-wage workers aren’t teenagers working a first job. And most aren’t fast-food workers either.

(Although, hey! Teenagers working a first job deserve to be paid respectfully too, no matter how sullen and emo they are.)

They’re health care workers like this:

 

 

And professors like this:

 

 

And retail workers like this:

 

 

Moms. Dads. Cooks. Cashiers. Teachers. Students.

And not only are they out on the streets, shouting their lungs out for their right to be paid like human beings, they have support from all over the world.

I’m talking far-away places, people.

Places like Hamburg, Germany, where they’re encouraging their American colleagues to keep up the fight.

 

So Paulo, Brazil, where they’re staging die-ins in the street, despite intervention from military police.

 

 

 

 

Finland (What up, Finland!), where in addition to showing solidarity, they’re also protesting exploitative contracts.

 

 

 

 

Bangladesh, where garment workers are still struggling to unionize a year after a horrific building collapse left over 1,000 people dead.

 

 

Tokyo, where for over a year they’ve been demanding a 1,500-yen wage (about $12.60) to make living in one of the most expensive cities in the world actually somewhat livable.

 

 

And Auckland, New Zealand, where many fast-food workers work on “zero-hour” contracts that force them to make themselves available to work but give them no guaranteed hours.

So yeah. This thing is getting real. Really, really real.

The Fight for $15 movement has already had some major success. $15 minimum wage ordinances were passed in Seattle and San Francisco last year, and other cities across America might follow suit soon.

But the pressure needs to stay on for that to actually happen!

If you believe all workers should be treated with dignity and respect and paid accordingly then please share and spread the word!

 

Read more: http://www.upworthy.com/these-photos-from-around-the-world-should-scare-the-pants-off-of-mcdonalds-and-walmart?c=tpstream

A Billionaire Just Donated $250 Million To Form A Revolutionary Cancer-Fighting Team Of Scientists

Medical science is on a constant quest to understand cancer, and ultimately destroy it. Certainly, there have been some incredible advances in the last decade or so. We are now able to use nanosized Trojan horses to erode leukemia cells from within. We can get certain types of cancerous cells to turn on and kill each other. We can even use microscopic backpacks made of algae to deliver targeted chemotherapy treatment to tumors.

However, all this requires constant funding, constant scientific dedication, and the right kind of equipment. Venture capitalist Sean Parker, known by most as the founder of Napster and a co-founder of Facebook, clearly recognizes this: According to the Washington Post, he is backing a $250 million effort drive to attract hundreds of scientists, many of which are often in direct competition with each other, to join forces and focus their efforts on killing cancer.

These proverbial Avengers of the scientific world already number as many as 300, working at 40 laboratories in six world-class institutions: Stanford, the University of California (Los Angeles and California campuses), the University of Pennsylvania, the MD Anderson Cancer Center and the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. This heros roster is particularly impressive considering the plan was formally announced just this week.

The initiative is designed to focus on immunotherapy. Unlike chemotherapy methods designed to use drugs or instrumentation to physically destroy tumorous tissue, this relatively new scientific field hopes to kick-start the bodys own immune system to take up arms against cancer cells.

Cancer immunotherapy is such an incredibly complex field, and for every answer it seems to pose 10 more questions, said Parker, as reported by the Washington Post. Im an entrepreneur so I wish some of these questions had been answered yesterday.

Cancer kills millions of people every single year, so scientists are trying every possible method to reduce these numbers. Sebastian Kaulitzki/Shutterstock

Parker sees this new agglomeration of scientists fighting cancer as a way to remove the bureaucracy and red tape present in so many institutions. Although the researchers will spend most of their time at their own institutions, they will have access to every piece of data, equipment and funding being provided by the nonprofit Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy, based in San Francisco.

To oversee the scientific progress of the initiative, one member from each university will sit on a committee and deliberate what the best course of action is. Every piece of new research that the initiative produces will be able to be provided and even licensed to interested industries, but the intellectual property will remain with the original scientists.

The institute will be headed by Jeff Bluestone, the former provost of the University of California, San Francisco, and an immunologist. In addition, he is one of 28 members of a panel personally selected by U.S. Vice President Biden as part of his National Cancer Moonshot Initiative, a $1 billion drive to accelerate cancer research.

Bidens drive and Parkers are similar: apart from wanting to help the human race on a purely altruistic basis, theyve both had people close to them die as a result of cancer. Only time will tell if this massive collaboration will produce results after than individual institutions, but its certainly got everything going for it.

Photo Gallery

Read more: http://www.iflscience.com/health-and-medicine/sean-parker-just-used-250-million-form-revolutionary-cancer-fighting-team

World heading for catastrophe over natural disasters, risk expert warns

With cascading crises where one event triggers another set to rise, international disaster risk reduction efforts are woefully underfunded

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The worlds failure to prepare for natural disasters will have inconceivably bad consequences as climate change fuels a huge increase in catastrophic droughts and floods and the humanitarian crises that follow, the UNs head of disaster planning has warned.

Last year, earthquakes, floods, heatwaves and landslides left 22,773 people dead, affected 98.6 million others and caused $66.5bn (47bn) of economic damage (pdf). Yet the international community spends less than half of one per cent of the global aid budget on mitigating the risks posed by such hazards.

Robert Glasser, the special representative of the secretary general for disaster risk reduction, said that with the world already falling short in its response to humanitarian emergencies, things would only get worse as climate change adds to the pressure.

He said: If you see that were already spending huge amounts of money and are unable to meet the humanitarian need and then you overlay that with not just population growth [but] you put climate change on top of that, where were seeing an increase in the frequency and severity of natural disasters, and the knock-on effects with respect to food security and conflict and new viruses like the Zika virus or whatever you realise that the only way were going to be able to deal with these trends is by getting out ahead of them and focusing on reducing disaster risk.

Failure to plan properly by factoring in the effects of climate change, he added, would result in a steep rise in the vulnerability of those people already most exposed to natural hazards. He also predicted a rise in the number of simultaneous disasters.

As the odds of any one event go up, the odds of two happening at the same time are more likely. Well see many more examples of cascading crises, where one event triggers another event, which triggers another event.

Glasser pointed to Syria, where years of protracted drought led to a massive migration of people from rural areas to cities in the run-up to the countrys civil war. While he stressed that the drought was by no means the only driver of the conflict, he said droughts around the world could have similarly destabilising effects especially when it came to conflicts in Africa.

Its inconceivably bad, actually, if we dont get a handle on it, and theres a huge sense of urgency to get this right, he said. I think country leaders will become more receptive to this agenda simply because the disasters are going to make that obvious. The real question in my mind is: can we act before thats obvious and before the costs have gone up so tremendously? And thats the challenge.

A
Sheep cross parched land in Raqqa province, eastern Syria, where lack of rain and mismanagement of land and water resources have displaced thousands of people. Photograph: Khaled al-Hariri/Reuters

But Glasser, speaking ahead of next months inaugural world humanitarian summit in Istanbul, said international disaster risk reduction (DRR) efforts remain woefully underfunded.

According to UN figures, in 2014 just 0.4% of the global aid budget of $135.2bn roughly $540m was spent on DRR. Glasser said the UN wanted that proportion to rise to at least 1% and would push for an increase at the Istanbul meeting.

Breakdown of international aid between 1991 and 2010

That would still be a very small amount of money to meet the problem and that is a big challenge, he said.

I used to work for a company that used to say, Once we get a little more money in, well start spending more of it on training our staff. But its too tight this year; maybe next year. This is one of those things like capacity-building with people: you have to start doing it. You cant wait. You just have to make choices.

He said that the internationally agreed Sendai framework for disaster risk reduction, which was adopted last year, offered the best way to reduce the human and financial cost of disasters.

Its basically about beginning to think of disaster risk as a core planning activity so that when countries invest in infrastructure theyre not building a hospital in a flood zone or establishing communities in areas vulnerable to storm surges and are not creating risk but identifying ways of reducing it, he said.

Thats the only way that I can imagine were going to be able to cope at all and even then, its a huge challenge to do that.

The special representative said that DRR simply could not be seen as an adjunct of development or humanitarian relief: they were all part of the same structure. He said that in countries such as Bangladesh, which regularly experiences devastating floods, thousands of lives had been saved over recent decades because DRR had been factored into core economic planning and money invested in infrastructure, storm shelters and early warning systems.

Last years earthquake in Nepal was another case in point and an example of the need for a more holistic approach to development and DRR.

2015 disaster related deaths

If you take Nepal, there was a school safety programme that retro-fitted something like 350 to 400 schools to be prepared for earthquakes. As I understand it, not one of those schools collapsed or was damaged significantly during the earthquake, said Glasser.

So this is a great example of the links between sustainable development and risk reduction. Theres something like 35,000 public and private schools in that country. If you build them and theyre not earthquake-resilient, and tens of thousands of them are destroyed, it just highlights that you need to get it right the first time if youre going to achieve a development outcome like improving literacy or the education of girls.

Nepal earthquake 2015: drone footage shows devastation in ancient town of Bhaktapur – video

Read more: http://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2016/apr/24/world-heading-for-catastrophe-over-natural-disasters-risk-expert-warns

Kitchen Science: Everything You Eat Is Made Of Chemicals

This is the first in our ongoing Kitchen Science series exploring the physics, chemistry and biology that takes place in your home.

We are routinely warned by earnest websites, advertisments and well-meaning popular articles about nasty chemicals lurking in our homes and kitchens. Many tout the benefits of switching to a chemical-free lifestyle.

The problem is: the word chemical is entirely misused in these contexts. Everything is a chemical common table salt (sodium chloride), for instance, and even water (dihydrogen oxide).

The chemicals in our diet are often categorised into four broad categories: carbohydrates, proteins, fats and lipids, and everything else. This final group has no defining characteristics but includes vitamins, minerals, pharmaceuticals and the hundreds of trace chemicals each of us consume everyday.

Of course, there are toxic and harmful chemicals, but just as many are completely fine for human consumption. So heres a handy guide to the chemicals in your kitchen, and what they mean for your health.

The macronutrient chemicals

Proteins, lipids (such as fats) and carbohydrates are known as the macronutrients, and provide most of our daily energy needs. Despite 118 known elements in the periodic table, these three categories predominantly contain just four elements carbon, hydrogen, oxygen and nitrogen with trace amounts of the remaining elements.

Chemicals called amino acids link together to create proteins. The richest sources include meat and eggs, but significant amounts are also found in beans, legumes and wheat flour.

Carbohydrates contain just carbon, hydrogen and oxygen atoms, all connected in very particular ways. Carbs include sugars, starch and cellulose, all of which are digested differently.

While sugars are one type of carbohydrate, artificial sweeteners, such as aspartame and saccharin, are not actually carbohydrates.

Despite concerns about the health effects of artificial sweeteners, the health spotlight has recently been placed on the natural sweeteners: the sugars.

White sugar (sucrose) and high-fructose corn syrup (a mixture of fructose and glucose) have been linked to range of wide-spread health conditions.

Just like carbs, fats only contain carbon, hydrogen and oxygen, but gram for gram release more than twice the dietary energy of either protein or the carbs. Perhaps its for this reason fats have copped a lot of bad press for longer than the sugars. Nevertheless, some fat is absolutely essential for a healthy diet.

Acids and bases

Acid sounds bad. But there are many acids sitting benignly in our pantries and fridges.

Consider varieties of food and drink that are acidic. A classic example we often hear is that Coca-Cola has a pH value of about 3.2 (lower means more acidic with 7 being neutral). Thats strong enough to remove rust from metal. And its true thanks to the phosphoric acid in Coke.

Watch as Coke eats away at surface rust.

As it happens, the human stomach also contains phosphoric acid, and has an even stronger acidic pH value. Actually, apples and oranges have a similar pH value to Coke, and lemon juice is ten times more acidic.

The acidic characteristics of food and drink combine with other chemicals to provide flavour, and without some acidic character, many foods would be bland.

Chemically speaking, the opposite of acidic is known as basic, or alkali. While acidic substances have a pH < 7, basic foods have pH > 7. Examples of basic foods from the kitchen are fewer, but include eggs, some baked products like cakes and biscuits, and bicarb soda.

Toxic chemicals in the kitchen

Obviously, there are also toxic chemicals lurking in our kitchen cupboards. But these are usually kept under the sink, and often have pH values at the extreme ends of the spectrum.

Cleaning products such as ammonia and lye (i.e. Drano) are very basic. Soaps and detergents are also at the basic end of the scale.

Acidic cleaning solutions are also common, such as concentrated sulfuric acid, which can also be used to unblock drains.

Cooking is chemistry

Cooking itself is really just chemistry. Heating, freezing, mixing and blending are all processes used in the laboratory and the kitchen.

When we cook food, a myriad of different physical and chemical processes simultaneously take place to transform the ingredients (i.e. chemicals) involved.

Carbohydrates are an interesting case study. Simple sugars combine with proteins in the Maillard reaction, which is responsible for browning food when its cooked. Add a little more heat and caramelisation takes over, while too much heat for too long leads to burnt flavours.

It takes some deft chemistry to make a seasoned smoked brisket. jeffreyw/Flickr, CC BY

Starch is another carbohydrate well known for its ability to create gels, such as in a panna cotta. Upon heating, powdered starch combines with water and completely different texture is created.

So next time you hear someone say I dont like to put chemicals into my body, feel free to chuckle. Everything is made of chemicals. Wed be in a bit of strife without chemicals, not least in the kitchen.

Hey an interesting post and content to read more about sites managed here and by Robert A Williams then take a look at Robert A Williams on BrandYourself

Read more: http://www.iflscience.com/chemistry/kitchen-science-everything-you-eat-made-chemicals

Kitchen Science: Everything You Eat Is Made Of Chemicals

This is the first in our ongoing Kitchen Science series exploring the physics, chemistry and biology that takes place in your home.

We are routinely warned by earnest websites, advertisments and well-meaning popular articles about nasty chemicals lurking in our homes and kitchens. Many tout the benefits of switching to a chemical-free lifestyle.

The problem is: the word chemical is entirely misused in these contexts. Everything is a chemical common table salt (sodium chloride), for instance, and even water (dihydrogen oxide).

The chemicals in our diet are often categorised into four broad categories: carbohydrates, proteins, fats and lipids, and everything else. This final group has no defining characteristics but includes vitamins, minerals, pharmaceuticals and the hundreds of trace chemicals each of us consume everyday.

Of course, there are toxic and harmful chemicals, but just as many are completely fine for human consumption. So heres a handy guide to the chemicals in your kitchen, and what they mean for your health.

The macronutrient chemicals

Proteins, lipids (such as fats) and carbohydrates are known as the macronutrients, and provide most of our daily energy needs. Despite 118 known elements in the periodic table, these three categories predominantly contain just four elements carbon, hydrogen, oxygen and nitrogen with trace amounts of the remaining elements.

Chemicals called amino acids link together to create proteins. The richest sources include meat and eggs, but significant amounts are also found in beans, legumes and wheat flour.

Carbohydrates contain just carbon, hydrogen and oxygen atoms, all connected in very particular ways. Carbs include sugars, starch and cellulose, all of which are digested differently.

While sugars are one type of carbohydrate, artificial sweeteners, such as aspartame and saccharin, are not actually carbohydrates.

Despite concerns about the health effects of artificial sweeteners, the health spotlight has recently been placed on the natural sweeteners: the sugars.

White sugar (sucrose) and high-fructose corn syrup (a mixture of fructose and glucose) have been linked to range of wide-spread health conditions.

Just like carbs, fats only contain carbon, hydrogen and oxygen, but gram for gram release more than twice the dietary energy of either protein or the carbs. Perhaps its for this reason fats have copped a lot of bad press for longer than the sugars. Nevertheless, some fat is absolutely essential for a healthy diet.

Acids and bases

Acid sounds bad. But there are many acids sitting benignly in our pantries and fridges.

Consider varieties of food and drink that are acidic. A classic example we often hear is that Coca-Cola has a pH value of about 3.2 (lower means more acidic with 7 being neutral). Thats strong enough to remove rust from metal. And its true thanks to the phosphoric acid in Coke.

Watch as Coke eats away at surface rust.

As it happens, the human stomach also contains phosphoric acid, and has an even stronger acidic pH value. Actually, apples and oranges have a similar pH value to Coke, and lemon juice is ten times more acidic.

The acidic characteristics of food and drink combine with other chemicals to provide flavour, and without some acidic character, many foods would be bland.

Chemically speaking, the opposite of acidic is known as basic, or alkali. While acidic substances have a pH < 7, basic foods have pH > 7. Examples of basic foods from the kitchen are fewer, but include eggs, some baked products like cakes and biscuits, and bicarb soda.

Toxic chemicals in the kitchen

Obviously, there are also toxic chemicals lurking in our kitchen cupboards. But these are usually kept under the sink, and often have pH values at the extreme ends of the spectrum.

Cleaning products such as ammonia and lye (i.e. Drano) are very basic. Soaps and detergents are also at the basic end of the scale.

Acidic cleaning solutions are also common, such as concentrated sulfuric acid, which can also be used to unblock drains.

Cooking is chemistry

Cooking itself is really just chemistry. Heating, freezing, mixing and blending are all processes used in the laboratory and the kitchen.

When we cook food, a myriad of different physical and chemical processes simultaneously take place to transform the ingredients (i.e. chemicals) involved.

Carbohydrates are an interesting case study. Simple sugars combine with proteins in the Maillard reaction, which is responsible for browning food when its cooked. Add a little more heat and caramelisation takes over, while too much heat for too long leads to burnt flavours.

It takes some deft chemistry to make a seasoned smoked brisket. jeffreyw/Flickr, CC BY

Starch is another carbohydrate well known for its ability to create gels, such as in a panna cotta. Upon heating, powdered starch combines with water and completely different texture is created.

So next time you hear someone say I dont like to put chemicals into my body, feel free to chuckle. Everything is made of chemicals. Wed be in a bit of strife without chemicals, not least in the kitchen.

Hey an interesting post and content to read more about sites managed here and by Robert A Williams then take a look at Robert A Williams on BrandYourself

Read more: http://www.iflscience.com/chemistry/kitchen-science-everything-you-eat-made-chemicals

A comic that accurately sums up depression and anxiety and the uphill battle of living with them

 

Sarah Flanigan has been fighting depression since she was 10 years old and anxiety since she was 16. “I wish everyone knew that depression is not something that people can just ‘snap out of,'” she explains. “I mean, if I could ‘snap out of it,’ I would have by now.”

Depression and anxiety disorders are real illnesses. Mental illnesses are not “in someone’s head,” they’re not something a person can “just get over,” and they affect so many of us over 40 million people in the U.S. alone.

Despite how common they are, it’s still really difficult to explain to people who may have never experienced a mental illness.

Enter: cute, clever illustrations that get the job done.

Nick Seluk, who creates the amazing comics at The Awkward Yeti, heard from reader Sarah Flanigan. She shared her story of depression and anxiety with him. If it could help even one person, she said, it would be worth it.

Nick turned her story into a fantastic comic that perfectly captures the reality of living with depression and anxiety.

“I’ve been through and seen depression and anxiety in action, and thought Sarah’s story was so perfectly simple,” he told me. “We all get sick physically and mentally, but we need to be open to talking (and laughing) about [it].”

I couldn’t agree more, and I think this comic will resonate with a lot of people.

Simple yet powerful, right?

“The hardest part of living with depression and anxiety for me is feeling like I have to hide it,” Sarah said. “I’ve always been known as the happy one in my group of friends. Everyone’s always so shocked when I tell them I have depression or they see the self-harm scars.”

“It’s much harder than it should be to say, ‘Hey, I have depression and I’ve been struggling with self-harm since I was 10 and I just really need your support to get me through tonight,'” Sarah explained.

Let’s all keep working to make it easier for our friends, family members, and ourselves to get support. Let’s keep talking about it.

 

Read more: http://www.upworthy.com/a-comic-that-accurately-sums-up-depression-and-anxiety-and-the-uphill-battle-of-living-with-them?c=tpstream

This Cafe Offers Free Cup Of Tea To Breastfeeding Moms

Being a mom is tough, and being a new mom is especially tough. Which is why this coffee shop in Sydney decided to put a sign in the window inviting breastfeeding moms to come inside and have a free cup of tea and some relaxing downtime.

“breastfeeding mums,” reads the sign at The Willows Cafe in the Sydney suburb of Willoughby, “pop in, have a free cup of tea if you need a pitt stop…no need to eat, no need to ask – please relax : ) Willows”.

The sign has been a hit with toddler-toting moms, and many have made the most of the chance to pop in and relax while they feed their little ones. In a time when breastfeeding woman are often told to cover up in public (as highlighted by recent cases in Australia and England), we’re glad that this awesome coffee shop is focusing on what’s really important.

Read more: http://www.boredpanda.com/free-tea-for-breastfeeding-mothers-cafe-sign/